Activity: The External Brain – A Comparison of Convictions

The purpose of this activity is to create your personal definition of ‘external brain.’

Materials

Activity overview

In this activity, you’ll create your personal definition of ‘external brain.’ Understand that your definition has guided how you support, advocate and intervene.

Activity instructions

Part 1 – The self-regulation problem

In ‘Building Brain Boxes,’ the presenter describes the self-regulation problem, which asks:

If self-regulation requires executive functioning and executive functioning is a known deficit in FASD, how can we reasonably expect any self-regulation?

  1. How would you respond to this question?
  2. Krahn states that we live in a culture that says frontal lobe thinking is superior to other forms of thinking. What evidence can you cite to make this statement true or untrue?
  3. Krahn states that while providing Clarren’s “external brain support,” support people must also recognize that the brain has plenty of untapped potential.What evidence can you cite to make this statement true or untrue?
    • Do you agree or disagree?
  4. Describe in detail your version of Clarren’s “external brain.”
  5. Describe your idea of “strength-based” planning.

Part 2 – Comparisons

  1. Identify the similarities and differences in Clarren’s, Krahn’s and Rasmussen/Pei’s perspectives on executive function.
  2. Using slides 24-27 in the video ‘Cognitive Interventions for Individuals with FASD,’ how are Rasmussen and Pei likely to define the “external brain”?
  3. What connections do you see, if any, between:
    • Krahn’s “least to most intervention”
    • Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development (slide 27 in Rasmussen and Pei)
    • Rasmussen and Pei’s ‘Tools of the Mind’ program? (slides 28-32 from the video ‘Cognitive Interventions for Individuals with FASD’)
Created:
Modified: 2015-09-09
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